Home owner told to apply for permission over flood sign

Before and After: The flood marker on The Old Mill in Bridge Street, which commemorates the Great Flood of May 29, 1920, in which 23 people died.
Before and After: The flood marker on The Old Mill in Bridge Street, which commemorates the Great Flood of May 29, 1920, in which 23 people died.
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The owners of a home in Louth where a historic flood marker was covered without permission have been orderd by East Lindsey District Council to apply for retrospective consent.

As reported in July, residents were furious to see that the flood marker, on The Old Mill in Bridge Street, appeared to have been plastered over.

This was seen by many as being disrespectful to the 23 people who died during the ‘Great Flood’ of May 1920.

At the time, ELDC said: “Bridge Street is a conservation area and the Old Mill remains a Grade II Listed Building... Any works to a listed building and those that affect the character of the building would be required to have listed building consent.”

The council had not received any such application and therefore an investigation was launched by the Planning Enforcement Team.

Now, the council says that the householder has been given 28 days to apply for retrospective planning permission - or return the marker to its original state.

An ELDC spokesman said: “Planning permission was needed for the work 
that has been undertaken.

“The council has written to the property owner to request that a retrospective planning application be submitted for the council to 
consider or the marker be returned to its original state.”

The spokesman added that the letter was sent to the property owner on September 10, and they have 28 days 
in which to respond.

A house sitter at The Old Mill refused to comment on the matter when approached, and added that the property owner would not wish to comment either.

l Police confirmed the plaster had been damaged recently. If you have any information, call 101 and quote incident 148 of September 14.