Hospice ‘Angels’ help Anderby Creek man spend final days at home

Keith Shelton pictured with his wife Mary.
Keith Shelton pictured with his wife Mary.

A father diagnosed with terminal cancer has thanked the help of Hospice ‘Angels’ so he is able to spend his final days at home with his family.

Keith Shelton,62, from Anderby Creek, near Sutton on Sea was given just three months to live after he was diagnosed with advanced oesophageal cancer before Christmas.

Mr Shelton underwent palliative chemotherapy, but it failed.

The married father-of- four was then referred to St Barnabas Hospice for specialist end of life care.

He explained: “I was sceptical at first because I thought hospice care meant that I would have to leave my family to be looked after in a hospice somewhere. I had no idea there was Hospice at Home nurses who would care for me in my own home.”

Keith has praised the St Barnabas nurses for giving him the support, so he is able to be cared for at home with the people that mean the most to him.

He added: “The St Barnabas nurses have been a blessing from the very beginning as they have become like friends to my family and me.

“They are more than just nurses, they are all angels.

“They immediately helped to get my pain and symptoms under control, which means I have a better quality of life and can enjoy the time I have left.”

Keith wants to make the most of each day and spend quality time with his family, including his youngest son.

“My family means everything to me and being at home means that I can be part of making lasting memories that will hopefully live on long after I have gone,” Keith said.

“My youngest son is only four-years- old and I didn’t want to miss a single second of his life now, when I am going to miss out on so much of his future. I know that even after I’ve gone St Barnabas will continue to be there for my family, and that offers me real comfort on the darkest of days.”

Louise Garwood, clinical team lead for St Barnabas Hospice, said: “Our priority is to ensure that the patient has a good quality of life and they are able to enjoy the time they have left with their loved ones.

“Managing the medical needs of our patients is one of the most important parts of our roles, but just as important is to provide the ‘human touch’ and to look after the whole family who will be feeling the strain too.”