It’s official - bathing waters along our coast among best in country

Skegness is one of nine bathing spots in the county which continue to be among the very best in England, according to the Environment Agency. ANL-171114-132644001
Skegness is one of nine bathing spots in the county which continue to be among the very best in England, according to the Environment Agency. ANL-171114-132644001

Bathing waters along the east coast of Lincolnshire continue to be among the very best in England, latest official statistics show.

All nine official swimming spots in the county achieved the highest ratings of either ‘good’ or ‘excellent’, meaning they offer some of the cleanest and safest waters in the country, as well as in Europe.

Skegness, Ingoldmells South, Chapel St Leonards, Anderby, Moggs Eye, Mablethorpe Town, Sutton-on-Sea and Humberston Fitties all achieved the highest grade of ‘excellent’, while Cleethorpes achieved the second-best rating of ‘good’.

The high standards were matched across the country, with 92% of England’s 413 bathing waters achieving ‘good’ or ‘excellent’, and 98.3% meeting the tough standards required to reach at least ‘sufficient’ status.

It represents a huge stride since the early 1990s, when just 28% of bathing waters met the top water-quality standards that were then in force.

The Environment Agency continues to lead efforts to ensure bathing waters are maintained and improved further, working with partners and the public to reduce pollution.

The agency monitors water quality throughout the summer to ensure people can make informed choices about when and where to bathe. Beach owners and local councils display signs at designated bathing waters and the Environment Agency makes the results available online.

Water quality results are classified as ‘excellent’, ‘good’, ‘sufficient’ or ‘poor’.

The classifications are based on the level of bacteria in the water as monitored by the Environment Agency between May and September. Up to four years of results are combined to let people know how clean the water is over that time.

Sir James Bevan, chief executive of the Environment Agency, said: “Maintaining such high water quality standards at English beaches is a huge success and a credit to all those individuals and organisations working hard to keep our bathing waters clean. Water quality has improved significantly over the last two decades – but to protect and enhance water quality even further we will need everyone to take the small actions that will help.”

Visitors to beaches and local communities are urged to clear up and not leave mess on the beach. Every business and household can ensure they don’t contribute to pollution on beaches by not pouring fats down drains and not flushing wet wipes.

People can check the results for their beach by visiting the Bathing Water Explorer online. This year, people have been able to see more advice on signs at beaches and get better information online about water quality at any bathing beach.