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Canine companion helps Saltfleet man unearth 40 bullets from the Second World War

With the help of his four legged friend, German Shepherd Sky, Adrian Tew from Saltfleet has unearthed 40 bullets thought to be dating back to the Second World War. Photo: Ian Holmes.

With the help of his four legged friend, German Shepherd Sky, Adrian Tew from Saltfleet has unearthed 40 bullets thought to be dating back to the Second World War. Photo: Ian Holmes.

 

She’s no gun dog, but German Shepherd Sky surprised her owner when he discovered 40 live five-inch bullets in the garden of his Saltfleet home.

When his canine companion dug up a live round this week, Adrian Tew was spurred on and picked up his metal detector, which then unearthed a further 40 bullets.

Adrian said: “My dog Sky was just digging holes in the garden like she normally does and brought this bullet up to the surface on Friday evening.

“Having measured the bullet, it came out to be five inches long and around three quarters of an inch in thickness.

“I wasn’t able to get the chance to investigate the find in more depth until Sunday evening. I then got my metal detector out in the garden where the first one was uncovered and found another 40 of them, all of which were in the same place.”

Adrian added: “Along with the bullets, I also found a hessian sack which they would have gone into.

“After receiving some help from my work colleagues son, Thomas Mumford, who shares my interest in history, we discovered that the bullets are most likely to be St Louis ones from Missouri in America, and have red paint at the top and were likely to be shot out of a M2 machine gun and are likely to be dated back to the Second World War.”

Having found smaller items in the past, this is the first time that Adrian has uncovered a find of this magnitude.

“I have found smaller bullets in the past, but nothing anywhere near the size of these bullets I have just discovered,” Adrian said.

“I personally find it quite exciting as I have always been interested in history and the different types of artefacts that can be found in the ground.”

Adrian’s residence is situated on a hill and at the bottom is the original flood defence, there are rumours that there were bases d
otted around the area, so he believes the bullets could be from one.

Adrian soon realised that he needed to give the bullets to the proper authority as soon as possible.

He added: “The shells I found are not empty ones, which means they are still live rounds and obviously now the initial excitement has gone, I stopped to think that there is the danger element to factor in with live rounds, which is a little bit unnerving so I was quick to contact the MOD for advice.”

But the story doesn’t end there, Adrian then had the task of finding out where he could take the bullets.

“I initially called the MOD range warden who was unsure on what to do, so went to seek further advice and came back and informed me to call the police,” Adrian said.

“So I did just that and again after seeking further advice, I was told to take them to my local police station, which was Mablethorpe.

“Being a bit unsure themselves, they quickly shut the door to the public and kept me in a room for health and safety reasons and then after some time passed said I could go and to leave the bullets with them.”

Lincolnshire Police were unable to confirm how the bullets were being dealt with at the time of going to press, but said the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) usually takes them away.

 

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