DCSIMG

Police found shoeless drink driver who smelt of alcohol and car in ditch

Court case

Court case

A Manby woman, whose alcohol level was almost three times the legal limit, drove her car into a ditch, a court has heard.

Kimberly Victoria Ward-Pawson, 28, of Carlton Road, admitted driving with excess alcohol on December 21 when she appeared before Judge John Stobart at Skegness Magistrates Court.

Paul Wood, prosecuting, said that at 11pm, police went to Keddington Corner, which is an isolated unlit road, where they found a Nissan Micra car that had crossed the road and gone into a ditch on a sharp right hand bend.

Ward-Pawson was at the scene.

She was shoeless and smelt of alcohol, but denied that she was the driver and refused to take a breath test, the court heard.

However, she was taken to Louth Police Station where she gave a sample of breath, which showed a reading of 102 microgrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres of breath. The legal limit is 35.

In the meantime her shoe had been found in the driver’s well in the car.

she admitted she was the driver and that she had drunk five or six glasses of wine, the court heard.

Defending, Ian Benson said Ward-Pawson knew full well that what she did was very wrong.

He said she had a 20 mile trip to work every day and she would now have to do that without her car.

He said she had an argument with her partner and in the heat of the moment had decided to drive home, the court heard.

Judge Stobart said he could see that Ward-Pawson, who sobbed throughout the hearing, very much regretted being in court.

He told her that with that amount of alcohol in her body, if someone had been standing at that point where she had gone off the road, she would have been facing a five or six year prison sentence.

She was fined £500 and ordered to pay £85 in costs and was disqualified from driving for two years.

She was offered the drink drivers’ rehabilitation course, which would reduce the period of disqualification by six months.

 

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