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Resident warns of ‘monster’ housing development for Louth at public meeting

Chair of the meeting, Coun Sarah Dodds, addresses residents at the public meeting where the planned Fulmar Drive housing development was debated.

Chair of the meeting, Coun Sarah Dodds, addresses residents at the public meeting where the planned Fulmar Drive housing development was debated.

A RESIDENT speaking at a public meeting likened a proposed Louth housing development to a ‘monster’ and warned ‘once it has been let out of the cage it cannot go back’.

He was speaking at a meeting, organised on Wednesday by residents opposed to Taylor Wimpey’s proposed housing plans for land off Fulmar Drive, held at the Trinity Centre.

“Locals will have to live with the problems it brings,” said the resident, responding to fears over an influx of new residents into the town.

Residents, opposed to the plans for up to 149 homes, have risen up in recent weeks after Simon Tighe, of Fulmar Drive, gathered opposition.

Representatives from East Lindsey District Council, Lincolnshire County Council, and the Environment Agency fielded questions during the three hour debate with around 100 residents.

“This is the start of a long journey,” Mr Tighe told the room.

ELDC planning officer Paul Thompson responded to Kestrel Drive resident Andy Wood, who said an environment impact assessment had been ‘sidestepped’.

Mr Thompson said that ‘all issues from the assessment would be covered’ and that there were no fears of wider environmental implications.

Highways officer Cliff Vivian maintained that the town’s road network would cope with more cars, and said negotiations over a new roundabout outside the Co-op store were ongoing.

“Putting in a roundabout will make no difference,” said one resident, while another warned that the current ‘chicane system’ was asking for trouble.

Mr Vivian responded to calls for a new road to link to the A16 by saying more traffic would be dragged onto Brackenborough Road.

Another resident argued that the development was ‘in the wrong place’.

Other issues raised included school places, flooding and social housing. Mr Thompson said recent flooding in Riverhead was ‘unfortunate’ and that work was being done to put it right, while admitting to the district’s under supply of housing, adding ‘local people would be catered for first’.

Greg Smith, of the Environment Agency, told residents that their fears ‘were being heard by Government and ourselves’, and Coun Laura Stephenson said planners could be relied upon to make the right decision.

Roger Smith, of planning agent Savills, said: “We accept traffic as the number one issue, but want to address these issues raised in any way we can.

“Negotiations are in place for a roundabout by the Co-op and a zebra crossing on the Spar junction to make it easier to cross.

“We genuinely do not think there is likely to be a sustained objection on the grounds of flood risk.”

What did you make of the meeting and the plans? Email your views to sam.kinnaird@jpress.co.uk

 

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