Trust plans for future of Monks’ Dyke school

Monks' Dyke Tennyson College in Louth.
Monks' Dyke Tennyson College in Louth.

The King Edward VI Education Trust has presented formal plans to restore Monks’ Dyke Tennyson College to its ‘former glory days’ to 
the education authorities.

Last Monday, the King Edward VI Education Trust presented plans for a ‘sustainable future’ for the school to Lincolnshire County Council, the Department for Education (DfE) and the Interim Executive Board.

James Lascelles, the chief executive of the trust and headmaster of King Edward VI Grammar School, said: “These plans build upon the collaborative principles that we have already used to establish a joint Sixth Form and would seek to deepen cooperation and collaboration across 
the three secondary schools in Louth, whilst seeking collaborative support and backing from the local authority and the Department for 
Education of a Louth based solution.”

Mr Lascelles continued: “Collaboration and cooperation are at the core of our vision because we believe that this is the best way for Louth to not only retain three secondary schools, but also to retain educational choice and variety for both parents and children.

“We hope that today we have been able to persuade the local authority, Department for Education 
Board and the Interim Executive Board of the strength of moral purpose we feel about a Louth based solution.

“Our vision for Monks’ Dyke Tennyson College is built firmly on restoring the school to its former glory days as one of the most successful comprehensives in the county by ensuring that there is strong leadership, effective pastoral support and a nurturing ethos.

“By tapping into support from King Edward’s and also by working collaboratively with Cordeaux, we remain convinced that our offer to the local authority, Department for Education and the Interim Executive Board is a strong and sustainable, and most importantly one that is focused on finding a Louth based solution.”

Mr Lascelles did not provide further details about the practical measures involved in the plans.

Margaret Johnson, the chair of the King Edward VI Education Trust, added: “We accept and understand that, as a trust, we must now wait for the Department for Education, local authority and Interim Executive Board to consider our offer and inform us of their decision before we can move forward with any further steps.”

An open evening for the aforementioned Louth Joint Sixth Form was held at Louth Town Hall on Thursday (February 9) evening.

The joint sixth form, a collaboration between King Edwards’, Monks’ Dyke and Cordeaux, aims to offer a ‘broad and comprehensive offer’ to Y11 pupils in Louth.
• Visit www.ljsf.co.uk for more.