‘Zombie-like’ teenager faces jail after incident

Court news
Court news

Police called to a serious disturbance at an 18th birthday party were assaulted by a “zombie-like” teenager foaming at the mouth.

Two girls who barricaded themselves into a bedroom to keep away from 19-year-old Jack Andrew Wilson described it as like a scene out of a horror film.

The two officers who came to their rescue had months of pain and discomfort from their injuries and were forced to undertake restricted duties.

Wilson, of Moreland Avenue, Sutton on Sea, appeared at Boston Magistrates’ Court on Wednesday and was warned he faces more than 12 months in custody after pleading guilty to affray and two counts of assault on an emergency worker.

Prosecutor Shelley Wilson said things started going wrong at the house party on April 7 last year at about 2.30am after much drink had been consumed, particularly by the defendant.

“At one point he was quite violently sick, which triggered strange behaviour. He was mumbling sentences to himself, hitting his head against a wall and staring blankly. Two girls shut themselves into a bedroom.

“He was threatening them in a deep voice, saying ‘can someone get a knife, I need some cake’.”

College student Wilson slid a cable under the door and talked of being a different personality called Jason while hitting the door.

“The complainants were very frightened by this. Police found them in a very terrified state. They believed it was like something out of a horror film,” said the prosecutor.

Wilson launched himself down the stairs at the two police officers feet first, kicking a female in the face and connecting with the male’s chest. When he was caught after a short pursuit, he was described as “foaming at the mouth and zombie-like, with eyes bulging and face contorted”.

“It was quite psychotic behaviour and they had to repeat several times that Mr Wilson was under arrest,” said the prosecutor.

Solicitor Mike Alexander, mitigating, said his client claims not to have mental health issues but the incident might suggest otherwise.

“Mr Wilson can’t explain why this happened,” he added.

Committing Wilson to Lincoln Crown Court for sentencing, District Judge Peter Veits told him: “My maximum power is 12 months’ custody. I don’t think that’s enough to reflect the seriousness of these offences.”