Tips for keeping safe in the sea this summer in Mablethorpe and Sutton

RNLI lifeguards are warning beach-goers to take extra care with jellyfish and weeverfish this summer, as their presence increases in warmer weather. Photo credit: Mablethorpe Photo Album.
RNLI lifeguards are warning beach-goers to take extra care with jellyfish and weeverfish this summer, as their presence increases in warmer weather. Photo credit: Mablethorpe Photo Album.

The schools are now out for the summer and the warm weather shows no sign of ending - so the RNLI have given their advice on how to stay safe in the sea this season.

This advice comes after Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) lifeguards recently dealt with at least two jellyfish sting incidents.

RNLI lifeguards are warning beach-goers to take extra care with jellyfish and weeverfish this summer, as their presence increases in warmer weather. A girl from Mablethorpe was recently stung badly by a jellyfish. Photo: Supplied image.

RNLI lifeguards are warning beach-goers to take extra care with jellyfish and weeverfish this summer, as their presence increases in warmer weather. A girl from Mablethorpe was recently stung badly by a jellyfish. Photo: Supplied image.

One girl who was stung was 13-year-old Verity Stainton from Mablethorpe, who described her sting as an electric shock type of pain.

She was out in the sea swimming with friends when the incident happened, and told the Leader: “It was all randomly out of the blue.

“I knew it was a jellyfish, so I ran out of the water as fast 
as I could.”

Verity believes it could have been a Lion Mane’s Jellyfish,after revealing its big tentacles wrapped themselves around her body and arms.

RNLI lifeguards are warning beach-goers to take extra care with jellyfish and weeverfish this summer, as their presence increases in warmer weather. Photo: Mablethorpe Photo Album.

RNLI lifeguards are warning beach-goers to take extra care with jellyfish and weeverfish this summer, as their presence increases in warmer weather. Photo: Mablethorpe Photo Album.

Richard Harrington, Communications Manager from the Marine Conservation Society, confirmed this type of jellyfish can be seen on the East Coast, but is usually rare.

Verity’s mum, Christina added: “I was at home when the jellyfish stung Verity, and when didn’t realise how 
bad it was until I saw her.

“She was checked out by paramedics, but they believed she didn’t react to it, but was just a bad sting.

“It’s good for people to be aware of it, just in case that type of jellyfish is still in local waters.”

Jack Hood, RNLI Lifeguard Supervisor, revealed jellyfish sightings are common in the summer months around the UK coastline and lifeguards had assisted a couple of beach-goers in Mablethorpe and Sutton on Sea recently with minor jellyfish stings.

Mr Hood said: “We would advise people to always visit a lifeguarded beach, as we are equipped to deal with any incident or emergency and provide the safest cover for sunbathers, swimmers and water sports enthusiasts.

“If you are stung, you can remove the sting by scraping it away - using a credit card or stick - then soak the affected area in warm sea water. Always seek medical advice if symptoms become concerning.”

Weeverfish are also be found around our shores, and more stings occur in hot weather.

RNLI advice to avoid jellyfish and weeverfish stings is to always wear water shoes where possible (even old trainers are acceptable),and swim/play between the official lifeguards flags.